Laparoscopic Ovariectomy (Keyhole Spay)

“Because small holes hurt less and heal quicker.”

Tilly

Keyhole Spay Tower

Equipment

A ‘keyhole spay’, or a ‘laparoscopic ovariectomy’ to
use the technical term, is an alternative to traditional spaying (ovariohysterectomy) in dogs. The traditional spay has been used successfully for decades for neutering female dogs but the new technique gives all the benefits that keyhole surgery gives to humans.

 

The ovary is removed by being cauterised, there are no internal sutures.

The ovary is removed by being cauterised, there are no internal sutures.

Ovariectomy involves removing the ovaries only. The traditional spay involves removing the ovaries and the uterus (womb) which is a full ovariohysterectomy. The ovariectomy procedure is standard practice in most European countries and it has recently been shown that there is no reason to remove the uterus unless problems with the uterus have been identified. The data on this has been published in ‘Veterinary Surgery’ and the conclusion is that ovariectomy is the preferred method of sterilisation in the dog. Leaving the uterus means the surgery is less invasive.

Keyhole Spay Positioning 2

Keyhole Spay requires a larger clipped area of the abdomen

In addition, leaving the uterus intact, allows the uterus to continue to sling the bladder forward thus meaning no known risk of urinary incontinence later in life. This problem is more common in large breed bitches.

Laparoscopic techniques are often faster (less suturing) reducing the length of time the animal is anaesthetised. A larger clipped area is required to allow access for the surgical instruments.

Keyhole Spay Surgery

Instruments are inserted via 2 small incisions

The keyhole technique allows the surgeon to perform surgical procedures with a much smaller incision. This reduces pain and hastens healing. Also as there is less handling of internal tissues, there is less internal pain post surgery.

As the visualisation of all the tissues is improved using laparoscopy, and as the uterus is left intact, there are fewer complications during the surgery.

After a laparoscopic spay, your pet may recover so quickly, it is difficult to keep her as quiet as you will be advised! As with any surgical procedure, complications can arise due to the anaesthetic, bleeding, infection post-operatively and wound breakdown.  All risks are reduced with laparoscopic procedures.

The protocol is the same as a ‘traditional’ spay. We carry out the procedure before the first season or mid way between two seasons.

To find out any more information please contact us 01444 363636